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Rising mortgage rates brought uncertainty and caution to Metro Vancouver’s housing market in 2022


After seeing record sales and prices during the pandemic, Metro Vancouver’s housing market experienced a year of caution in 2022 due to rising borrowing costs fueled by the Bank of Canada’s ongoing battle with inflation. 


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 28,903 in 2022, a 34.3 per cent decrease from the 43,999 sales recorded in 2021, and a 6.6 per cent decrease from the 30,944 homes sold in 2020. 


Last year’s sales total was 13.4 per cent below the 10-year sales average. 


“The headline story in our market in 2022 was all about inflation and the Bank of Canada’s efforts to bring inflation back to target by rapidly raising the policy rate. This is a story we expect to continue to make headlines into 2023, as inflationary pressures remain persistent across Canada,” Andrew Lis, REBGV’s director, economics and data analytics said. 


Home listings on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver reached 53,865 in 2022. This is a 13.5 per cent decrease compared to the 62,265 homes listed in 2021 and a 0.8 per cent decrease compared to the 54,305 homes listed in 2020. 


Last year’s listings total was 3.2 per cent below the region’s 10-year average. 


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 7,384, a 41 per cent increase compared to December 2021 (5,236) and a 19.6 per cent decrease compared to November 2022 (9,179). 


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,114,300. This represents a 3.3 per cent decrease over December 2021, a 1.5 per cent decrease compared to November 2022, and a 9.8 per cent decrease over the past six months. 


“Closing out 2022, the data show that the Bank of Canada’s decisions to increase the policy rate at seven of the eight interest rate announcement dates in 2022 has translated into downward pressure on home sale activity and, to a lesser extent, home prices in Metro Vancouver,” Lis said. “While the consensus among many economists and forecasters suggests the Bank of Canada may be near the end of this tightening cycle, rates may remain elevated for longer than previously expected since the latest inflation figures aren’t showing signs of abating quickly. We’ll watch the 2023 spring market closely to see if buyers and sellers have adjusted to the higher borrowing-costs and are participating more actively in the market than we have seen over the last 12 months.” 


December 2022 summary


Residential home sales in the region totalled 1,295 in December 2022, a 51.8 per cent decrease from the 2,688 sales recorded in December 2021, and a 19.8 per cent decrease from the 1,614 homes sold in November 2022. 


Last month’s sales were 37.7 per cent below the 10-year December sales average. 


There were 1,206 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the MLS® in Metro Vancouver in December 2022. This represents a 38 per cent decrease compared to the 1,945 homes listed in December 2021 and a 60.5 per cent decrease compared to November 2022 when 3,055 homes were listed. 


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for December 2022 is 17.5 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 12.3 per cent for detached homes, 19.5 per cent for townhomes, and 21.7 per cent for apartments. 


Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months. 


Sales of detached homes in December 2022 reached 371, a 53.3 per cent decrease from the 794 detached sales recorded in December 2021. The benchmark price for a detached home is $1,823,300. This represents a 5.1 per cent decrease from December 2021, a 1.8 per cent decrease compared to November 2022, and an 11.4 per cent decrease over the past six months. 


Sales of apartment homes reached 702 in December 2022, a 52 per cent decrease compared to the 1,464 sales in December 2021. The benchmark price of an apartment home is $713,700. This represents a 1.7 per cent increase from December 2021, a 0.9 per cent decrease compared to November 2022, and a 6.9 per cent decrease over the past six months. 


Attached home sales in December 2022 totalled 222, a 48.4 per cent decrease compared to the 430 sales in December 2021. The benchmark price of an attached home is $1,012,700. This represents a 0.2 per cent decrease from December 2021, a 1.5 per cent decrease compared to November 2022, and a 9.2 per cent decrease over the past six months. 

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Multigenerational Home Renovation Tax Credit

This tax credit for families applies to eligible construction costs for those who wish to add a secondary unit to their home to allow an immediate or extended family member to live with them. To be eligible, the renovation must be completed in the owner’s primary residence where they live with a senior or disabled person. The tax credit covers 15 per cent of costs to a maximum of $7,500. Eligible expenses would include the cost of labour, building materials, equipment rentals and permits. Non-eligible expense examples include furniture, construction and equipment tools, routine repair or maintenance costs, household appliances and devices and landscaping or security services. Expenses must be supported by receipts.

Residential Property Flipping Rule
Individuals who purchase a residential property and sell it within 12 months of their purchase may be subject to the Residential Anti-Flipping Rule. Under the new rules, any profit from the sale of residential real estate (including rental property) within a year would be taxed as business income and ineligible for either the 50 per cent capital gains rate or the principal residence exemption.  


Exemptions include:


  • household addition, such as birth, adoption, or care of an elderly parent,
  • breakdown of a marriage or common-law partnership,
  • threat to personal safety, such as domestic violence,
  • change in employment,
  • insolvency, or
  • involuntary disposition, such as from a natural or human-caused disaster.


Source: REBGV

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BC government introduces “cooling off” period for home sales

 

On July 21, the provincial government introduced a home buyer protection period, the details of which are outlined in a new regulation that allows home buyers to back out of a residential purchase up to three business days after signing a contract.

The government will begin to enforce this regulation starting January 1, 2023.

The province claims this three-day cooling off period will help ensure all homebuyers have an opportunity to conduct their due diligence, such as securing financing or arranging home inspections.


Read the province’s announcement.

Read the regulations around the cooling off period.

Read the regulations around disclosure.


Key facts

The homebuyer protection period basics

  • The period will be effective January 1, 2023.
  • Buyers will have three business days to back out of a residential purchase after signing the contract.
  • This applies to all contracts, regardless of subjects. We’re asking the government for clarity on what constitutes a “rescission” (cancellation).
  • The period is mandatory and can’t be waived.
  • Buyers who back out of a contract within this three-day period will have to pay a rescission fee of 0.25%. For example, if the purchaser exercises the right of rescission on a $1-million home, they’d be required to pay the seller $2,500.
  • The rescission fee is paid to the seller.
  • The enforcement mechanism for the rescission fee, and for any deposits that may need to be returned, is unclear at this time.
  • Realtors must provide general information on the period to all clients through the Disclosure of Representation in Trading Services.

Deposits

  • If a deposit is held in trust, brokerages may release it upon rescission.
  • If there’s a balance, it’s returned to the buyer, regardless of what’s provided in the contract.

Exemptions and waivers

While the period can’t be waived, there are narrow exemptions, including sales:

Residential real estate defined

The homebuyer protection period will apply to:

  • detached homes;
  • semi-detached homes;
  • townhouses;
  • apartments in a duplex, triplex or other multi-unit dwelling;
  • residential strata lots;
  • manufactured homes that are affixed to land; and
  • cooperative interests that include a right of use or occupation of a dwelling.

The new period doesn’t apply to presale properties, which already subject to a rescission period under the Real Estate Development Marketing Act.


The notice of rescission

  • Homebuyers must serve rescission notice to the seller through registered mail, fax, email with read receipt, or personal service.
  • The notice must contain the address, PID or description of the property, the names and signature of the buyer(s), name of the seller(s), and the date of notice.

Additional Disclosure

Realtors must also provide an additional mandatory disclosure when presenting an offer to a client, outlining:

  • that the protection period can’t be waived,
  • the rescission period,
  • the dollar amount of the rescission fee,
  • deposit handling, and
  • the homebuyer protection period exemptions.

Records retention

  • Brokerages must retain a copy of any rescission notices it prepares or receives for auditing and reporting purposes.

Source: REBGV


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  • Federal Government Helping Canadians buy their first home by introducing the Tax-Free First Home Savings Account to allow first-time home buyers to save up to $40,000; doubling the First-Time Home Buyers’ Tax Credit to $10,000, providing up to $1,500 in direct support to home buyers; extending the First-Time Home Buyer Incentive to March 31, 2025, to allow first-time home buyers to lower their borrowing costs; and investing $200 million to help develop and scale up rent-to-own projects across Canada.
 


Source: REBGV

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Federal foreign buyer ban coming in January 2023

The federal government’s ban on new foreign ownership of residential property becomes law on January 1, 2023, disallowing anyone who isn’t a Canadian citizen or permanent resident from buying residential real estate for two years.


During this period, the federal government plans to work with provinces and municipalities to develop a framework to better regulate the role of foreign buyers in the housing market to ensure housing is available for and used by Canadians.


The Liberal Party promised the ownership ban in the 2021 election and rolled it out in the federal Budget 2022: a plan to grow our economy and make life more affordable. The budget was clear on the government’s goals:


“We will do everything we can to make the market fairer for Canadians. We will prevent foreign buyers from parking their money in Canada by buying up homes. We will make sure that houses are being used as homes, rather than as commodities to be traded,” – Budget 2022.


To this end, the government tabled Bill C-19,  Budget Implementation Act, 2022, No. 1. It received Royal Assent on June 23, 2022. Section 235 of the bill is the Prohibition on the Purchase of Residential Property by Non-Canadians Act.

Who can’t buy residential property?

The act defines a non-Canadian as:

  1. an individual who is neither a Canadian citizen nor a person registered as an Indian under the Indian Act nor a permanent resident;
  2. a corporation that is incorporated otherwise than under the laws of Canada or a province;
  3. a corporation incorporated under the laws of Canada or a province whose shares are not listed on a stock exchange in Canada for which a designation under section 262 of the Income Tax Act is in effect and that is controlled by a person referred to in paragraph (a) or (b); and
  4. a prescribed person or entity.

Exceptions

Include:

  • A temporary resident within the meaning of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act; or
  • A non-Canadian who buys residential property with a Canadian spouse or common-law partner if the spouse or common-law partner is a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, or person registered as an Indian under the Indian Act.

Residential property

Includes any real property or immovable that is:

  1. a detached house or similar building, containing not more than three dwelling units;
  2. a semi-detached house, rowhouse unit, residential condominium unit or other similar premises, vacant land, where the land has been zoned for residential use or mixed use and is within a Census Metropolitan Area (having a population of at least 100,000) or Census Agglomeration (having a population of at least 10,000); or
  3. any prescribed real property or immovable.

Penalties

Non-Canadians found guilty of contravening the act are subject to a fine of not more than $10,000. If the federal government orders the sale of the property, the non-Canadian buyer won’t receive more than the amount paid for the property.

Property Purchased by a Non-Canadian Before January 1, 2023

The ban doesn’t apply if the agreement of purchase and sale of the residential property involving a non-Canadian is dated before January 1, 2023.

Regulations

Future regulations will provide details on transactions deemed prohibited purchases, including whether exceptions apply to conditional contracts entered into before January 1, 2023, that become unconditional on or after January 1, 2023.
 
Source: REBGV
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Home sale and listing activity continue trending below long-term averages in November

VANCOUVER, BC – December 2, 2022 – While typically a quiet month of market activity based on seasonal patterns, November home sale and listing totals lagged below the region’s long-term averages.


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 1,614 in November 2022, a 52.9 per cent decrease from the 3,428 sales recorded in November 2021, and a 15.2 per cent decrease from the 1,903 homes sold in October 2022.


Last month’s sales were 36.9 per cent below the 10-year November sales average.


“With the most recent core inflation metrics showing a stubborn reluctance to respond significantly to the furious pace of rate increases, the Bank of Canada may choose to act more forcefully to bring inflation back toward target levels.” Andrew Lis, REBGV’s director, economics and data analytics said. “While it’s always difficult to predict what the bank will do with certainty, this persistent inflationary backdrop sets up the December 7 rate announcement to be yet another increase, making holiday-season home purchases something many people may end up foregoing this year.”


There were 3,055 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in November 2022. This represents a 22.9 per cent decrease compared to the 3,964 homes listed in November 2021 and a 24.2 per cent decrease compared to October 2022 when sellers listed 4,033 homes.


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 9,179, a 28.5 per cent increase compared to November 2021 (7,144) and a 6.8 per cent decrease compared to October 2022 (9,852).

“Heading into 2023, the mar

ket continues the trend of shifting toward historical averages and typical seasonal norms,” Lis said. “Whether these trends continue will depend on looming economic factors and forthcoming housing policy measures on the horizon, which hold the potential to reignite uncertainty in our market.


“With that said, from a long-term structural standpoint, the current pace of listings and available inventory remain relatively tight when considered against a backdrop of continued in-migration to the province. With the recently announced increase in federal immigration targets, the state of available supply in our market remains one demand surge away from renewed price escalation, despite the inflationary environment and elevated mortgage rates.”


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for November 2022 is 17.6 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 13.2 per cent for detached homes, 19.7 per cent for townhomes, and 20.8 per cent for apartments.


Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months.


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,131,600. This represents a 0.6 per cent decrease over November 2021, a 10.2 per cent decrease over the last six months, and a 1.5 per cent decrease compared to October 2022.


Sales of detached homes in November 2022 reached 486, a 50.8 per cent decrease from the 987 detached sales recorded in November 2021. The benchmark price for detached properties is $1,856,800. This represents a 1.7 per cent decrease from November 2021 and a 1.9 per cent decrease compared to October 2022.


Sales of apartment homes reached 847 in November 2022, a 53.7 per cent decrease compared to the 1,828 sales in November 2021. The benchmark price of an apartment property is $720,500. This represents a 3.5 per cent increase from November 2021 and a 0.9 per cent decrease compared to October 2022.


Attached home sales in November 2022 totalled 281, a 54.2 per cent decrease compared to the 613 sales in November 2021. The benchmark price of an attached unit is $1,027,900. This represents a 2.7 per cent increase from November 2021 and a 1.5 per cent decrease compared to October 2022.

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Metro Vancouver saw more home sellers and fewer buyers in September


Home sellers were more active in Metro Vancouver’s housing market in September while home buyer demand remained below the region’s long-term averages. 


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 1,687 in September 2022, a 46.4 per cent decrease from the 3,149 sales recorded in September 2021, and a 9.8 per cent decrease from the 1,870 homes sold in August 2022. 


Last month’s sales were 35.7 per cent below the 10-year September sales average. 


“With the Bank of Canada and other central banks around the globe hiking rates in an effort to stamp out inflation, the cost to borrow funds has risen substantially over a short period,” said Andrew Lis, REBGV director, economics and data analytics. “This has resulted in a more challenging environment for borrowers looking to purchase a home, and home sales across the region have dropped accordingly.” 


There were 4,229 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in September 2022. This represents an 18.2 per cent decrease compared to the 5,171 homes listed in September 2021 and a 27.1 per cent increase compared to August 2022 when 3,328 homes were listed. 


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 9,971, an eight per cent increase compared to September 2021 (9,236) and a 3.2 per cent increase compared to August 2022 (9,662). 


“With fewer homes selling and new listings continuing to come to market, inventory is beginning to accumulate, providing buyers with more selection compared to last year,” Lis said. “With more supply and less demand within this market cycle, residential home prices have edged down in the region over the last six months.” 


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for September 2022 is 16.9 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 12.4 per cent for detached homes, 18.4 per cent for townhomes, and 20.9 per cent for apartments. 


Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months. 


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,155,300. This represents a 3.9 per cent increase over September 2021, an 8.5 per cent decline over the past six months, and a 2.1 per cent decline compared to August 2022.


Sales of detached homes in September 2022 reached 525, a 44.7 per cent decrease from the 950 detached sales recorded in September 2021. The benchmark price for a detached home is $1,906,400. This represents a 3.8 per cent increase from September 2021 and a 2.4 per cent decrease compared to August 2022. 


Sales of apartment homes reached 888 in September 2022, a 45.2 per cent decrease compared to the 1,621 sales in September 2021. The benchmark price of an apartment home is $728,500. This represents a 6.2% per cent increase from September 2021 and a 1.6 per cent decrease compared to August 2022. 


Attached home sales in September 2022 totalled 274, a 52.6 per cent decrease compared to the 578 sales in September 2021. The benchmark price of an attached home is $1,048,900. This represents a 9.1 per cent increase from September 2021 and a 1.9 per cent decrease compared to August 2022. 

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Metro Vancouver’s housing market sees fewer home buyers and sellers in August


VANCOUVER, BC – September 2, 2022 – Metro Vancouver’s* housing market is experiencing a quieter summer season marked by reduced sale and listing activity.


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 1,870 in August 2022, a 40.7 per cent decrease from the 3,152 sales recorded in August 2021, and a 0.9 per cent decrease from the 1,887 homes sold in July 2022.


Last month’s sales were 29.2 per cent below the 10-year August sales average.


“With inflationary pressure and interest rates on the rise, home buyer and seller activity shifted below our long-term seasonal averages this summer,” Andrew Lis, REBGV’s director, economics and data analytics said. “This shift in market conditions caused prices to edge down over the past four months”


There were 3,328 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in August 2022. This represents a 17.5 per cent decrease compared to the 4,032 homes listed in August 2021 and a 16 per cent decrease compared to July 2022 when 3,960 homes were listed.


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 9,662, a 7.3 per cent increase compared to August 2021 (9,005) and a 6.1 per cent decrease compared to July 2022 (10,288).


“Home buyers and sellers are taking more time to assess what this changing landscape means for their housing needs,” Lis said. “Preparation is critical in today’s market. Work with your Realtor to assess what today’s home prices, financing options, and other considerations mean for you.”


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for August 2022 is 19.4 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 12.2 per cent for detached homes, 25.3 per cent for townhomes, and 24.8 per cent for apartments.


Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months.


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,180,500. This represents a 7.4 per cent increase over August 2021 and a 2.2 per cent decrease compared to July 2022.


Sales of detached homes in August 2022 reached 517, a 45.3 per cent decrease from the 945 detached sales recorded in August 2021. The benchmark price for a detached home is $1,954,100. This represents a 7.9 per cent increase from August 2021 and a 2.3 per cent decrease compared to July 2022.


Sales of apartment homes reached 998 in August 2022, a 38.8 per cent decrease compared to the 1,631 sales in August 2021. The benchmark price of an apartment home is $740,100. This represents an 8.7 per cent increase from August 2021 and a two per cent decrease compared to July 2022.


Attached home sales in August 2022 totalled 355, a 38.4 per cent decrease compared to the 576 sales in August 2021. The benchmark price of an attached home is $1,069,100. This represents a 12.7 per cent increase from August 2021 and a 2.5 per cent decrease compared to July 2022.

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Home listings up, sales down and prices starting to decrease to start the summer season 


 With interest rates and housing supply increasing, Metro Vancouver* home buyers are operating in a changing marketplace to begin the summer season. 


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 2,444 in June 2022, a 35 per cent decrease from the 3,762 sales recorded in June 2021, and a 16.2 per cent decrease from the 2,918 homes sold in May 2022. 


Last month’s sales were 23.3 per cent below the 10-year June sales average.

 
“Home buyers have more selection to choose from and more time to make decisions than they did over the past year,” Daniel John, REBGV Chair said. “Rising interest rates and inflationary concerns are making buyers more cautious in today’s housing market, which is allowing listings to accumulate.” 


There were 5,256 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in June 2022. This represents a 10.1 per cent decrease compared to the 5,849 homes listed in June 2021 and a 17.6 per cent decrease compared to May 2022 when 6,377 homes were listed. 


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 10,425, a 3.8 per cent decrease compared to June 2021 (10,839) and a 4.1 per cent increase compared to May 2022 (10,010). 


“We’re seeing downward pressure on home prices as we enter summer in Metro Vancouver due to declining home buyer activity, not increased supply,” John said. “To meet Metro Vancouver’s long-term housing demands, we still need to significantly increase housing supply.”


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for June 2022 is 23.4 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 14.3 per cent for detached homes, 31.5 per cent for townhomes, and 30.2 per cent for apartments. 


Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months. 


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,235,900. This represents a 12.4 per cent increase over June 2021, a two per cent decrease compared to May 2022, and a 2.2 per cent decrease over the past three months. 


Sales of detached homes in June 2022 reached 653, a 48.3 per cent decrease from the 1,262 detached sales recorded in June 2021. The benchmark price for a detached home is $2,058,600. This represents a 13.4 per cent increase from June 2021, a 1.7 per cent decrease compared to May 2022, and a 1.8 per cent decrease over the past three months. 


Sales of apartment homes reached 1,326 in June 2022, a 25.3 per cent decrease compared to the 1,774 sales in June 2021. The benchmark price of an apartment home is $766,300. This represents a 12.7 per cent increase from June 2021, a 1.7 per cent decrease compared to May 2022, and a 0.8 per cent decrease over the past three months. 


Attached home sales in June 2022 totalled 465, a 36 per cent decrease compared to the 726 sales in June 2021. The benchmark price of an attached home is $1,115,600. This represents a 17.8 per cent increase from June 2021, a 2.2 per cent decrease compared to May 2022, and a 2.7 per cent decrease over the past three months.


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Spring ushers in calmer housing market trends in Metro Vancouver


VANCOUVER, BC – June 2, 2022 – After reaching record-setting levels in 2021, home sale activity has returned to more typical seasonal levels in Metro Vancouver* this spring due, in large part, to rising interest rates.


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 2,918 in May 2022, a 31.6 per cent decrease from the 4,268 sales recorded in May 2021, and a 9.7 per cent decrease from the 3,232 homes sold in April 2022.


Last month’s sales were 12.9 per cent below the 10-year May sales average. “With interest rates rising, home buyers are taking more time to make their decisions in today’s housing market,” said Daniel John, REBGV Chair. “Home buyers have been operating in a frenzied environment for much of the past two years. This spring is providing a calmer environment, with fewer multiple offer situations, which is allowing buyers to explore their housing options, understand the changing mortgage market, and do their due diligence.”


There were 6,377 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in May 2022. This represents a 10.5 per cent decrease compared to the 7,125 homes listed in May 2021 and a 4.4 per cent increase compared to April 2022 when 6,107 homes were listed.


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 10,010, an 8.8 per cent decrease compared to May 2021 (10,970) and a 13.8 per cent increase compared to April 2022 (8,796).


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for May 2022 is 29.2 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 18.3 per cent for detached homes, 35.5 per cent for townhomes, and 38.1 per cent for apartments.


Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months.


The MLS® Home Price Index* (See editor’s note #2) composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,261,1001 . This represents a 14.7 per cent increase over May 2021 and a 0.3 per cent decrease compared to April 2022.


“Upward pressure on home prices has begun to ease in the housing market over the last two months,” John said. “Where home prices go next will depend on housing supply. While we’re beginning to see modest increases in home listings, we still need housing supply totals to more than double to bring the market close to balanced territory.”


Sales of detached homes in May 2022 reached 793, a 44.1 per cent decrease from the 1,419 detached sales recorded in May 2021. The benchmark price for a detached home is $2,093,600. This represents a 15 per cent increase from May 2021 and a 0.4 per cent decrease compared to April 2022.


Sales of apartment homes reached 1,605 in May 2022, a 21.7 per cent decrease compared to the 2,049 sales in May 2021. The benchmark price of an apartment home is $779,700. This represents a 15 per cent increase from May 2021 and a 0.4 per cent increase compared to April 2022.


Attached home sales in May 2022 totalled 520, a 35 per cent decrease compared to the 800 sales in May 2021. The benchmark price of an attached home is $1,141,200. This represents a 21.5 per cent increase from May 2021 and a 0.6 per cent decrease compared to April 2022.

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Listings inch up, demand remains steady and price gains continue in Metro Vancouver’s housing market in February


VANCOUVER, BC – March 2, 2022 – The Metro Vancouver* housing market saw steady home sales activity, modest increases in home listings and continued upward trends in pricing in February.


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 3,424 in February 2022, an 8.1 per cent decrease from the 3,727 sales recorded in February 2021, and a 49.8 per cent increase from the 2,285 homes sold in January 2022.


Last month’s sales were 26.9 per cent above the 10-year February sales average.


“As we prepare to enter what’s traditionally the busiest season of the year, the Metro Vancouver housing market is seeing more historically typical home sale activity and a modest uptick in home listing activity compared to last year,” Taylor Biggar, REBGV Chair said.


There were 5,471 detached, attached and apartment properties newly listed for sale on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in Metro Vancouver in February 2022. This represents an 8.4 per cent increase compared to the 5,048 homes listed in February 2021 and a 31.2 per cent increase compared to January 2022 when 4,170 homes were listed.


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 6,742, a 19.3 per cent decrease compared to February 2021 (8,358) and a 19.1 per cent increase compared to January 2022 (5,663).


Despite having a higher volume of people listing their homes for sale in February, the region’s housing market remains significantly undersupplied, which has been pushing home prices to new highs month after month,” Biggar said.


For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for February 2022 is 50.8 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 34.9 per cent for detached homes, 64.3 per cent for townhomes, and 62.2 per cent for apartments.


Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months.


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,313,400. This represents a 20.7 per cent increase over February 2021 and a 4.6 per cent increase compared to January 2022.


“A lack of housing supply is at the heart of the affordability challenges in Metro Vancouver today. We need more coordinated action from stakeholders at all levels to help create an ample, diverse supply of housing options for residents in the region today and into the future,” Biggar said.


Sales of detached homes in February 2022 reached 1,010, an 18 per cent decrease from the 1,231 detached sales recorded in February 2021. The benchmark price for detached properties is $2,044,800. This represents a 25 per cent increase from February 2021 and a 4.7 per cent increase compared to January 2022.


Sales of apartment homes reached 1,854 in February 2022, a 5.4 per cent increase compared to the 1,759 sales in February 2021. The benchmark price of an apartment property is $807,900. This represents a 15.9 per cent increase from February 2021 and a 4.1 per cent increase compared to January 2022.


Attached home sales in February 2022 totalled 560, a 24 per cent decrease compared to the 737 sales in February 2021. The benchmark price of an attached unit is $1,090,000. This represents a 27.2 per cent increase from February 2021 and a 5.9 per cent increase compared to January 2022.

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Helen Gambling
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Office: (604) 466-2838
The data relating to real estate on this website comes in part from the MLS® Reciprocity program of either the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV), the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) or the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board (CADREB). Real estate listings held by participating real estate firms are marked with the MLS® logo and detailed information about the listing includes the name of the listing agent. This representation is based in whole or part on data generated by either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB which assumes no responsibility for its accuracy. The materials contained on this page may not be reproduced without the express written consent of either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB.